Income and Work

September 30, 2018 by Tara Holmes
Closing the Gender Pay Gap

In 2016, West Virginia women earned just 72 cents on the dollar compared to their male counterparts. The median earnings of full-time male workers were $12,801 higher than the median earnings of full-time women workers - a 28 percent pay gap. West Virginia has the largest pay gap out of all the surrounding states and…

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August 28, 2018 by Sean O'Leary
Strengthening West Virginia Families

West Virginia can create a more prosperous state if the strength of working families and the policies that support them become a priority. This is according to a West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy report that details seven policies to reverse the top-down approach that has left the average West Virginian behind. Since 2006, West Virginia…

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April 6, 2018 by Sean O'Leary
Thousands of WV Workers Missing Out on Overtime Protection

A 2016 federal rule would have raised the salary threshold below which workers are automatically eligible for overtime pay—from $23,660 to $47,476 per year—restoring some of the coverage to inflation. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, workers eligible for overtime must be paid "time-and-a-half" or 1.5 times their regular pay rate for each hour of work…

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November 14, 2017 by Sean O'Leary
Poverty in West Virginia: Lack of Progress and New Threats Ahead

Sustained economic gains and strong federal and state programs have led to welcome progress in the nationwide fight against poverty over the last several years. This is good news. But West Virginia isn’t sharing in the national progress, as poverty here remains stagnant.  And actions from Congress and the Trump administration threaten to increase poverty…

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October 16, 2017 by WVCBP
New Report: Poverty in West Virginia Stagnate and New Threats Ahead

For Immediate Release Media Contact: Caitlin Cook, 304.543.4879 Sustained economic gains and strong federal and state programs have led to welcomed progress in the nationwide fight against poverty over the last several years.  This is good news.  But West Virginia is not sharing in the national progress, as poverty here remains stagnant.  And actions from…

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September 8, 2017 by Sean O'Leary
State of Working West Virginia – 2017

Poverty is a persistent problem in West Virginia, where tens of thousands of West Virginians live in poverty because their jobs do not pay a living wage. Read the full report. This 10th annual State of Working West Virginia focuses on low-wage work, including demographics of those who do the work; the industries that employ…

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December 12, 2016 by Ted Boettner
State of Working West Virginia 2016

A persistent question for those who pondered West Virginia’s fate is a simple: why, in a state rich in natural resources, are West Virginians so poor? For more than a century several explanations have been developed by natives and interested “outsiders.” Read the report. This report, the ninth annual investigation of The State of Working…

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November 9, 2015 by Sean O'Leary
State of Working West Virginia 2015

This report is the eighth in an annual series that examines the state of West Virginia’s economy. While previous editions examined data on employment, income, productivity, job quality and other aspects of the economy as they impact working people, this issue is an in-depth look at one specific economic measure - West Virginia’s labor force…

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August 26, 2015 by Sean O'Leary
Unionized Women Earn More in West Virginia

In honor of Women's Equality Day, recognizing the certification of the 19th Amendment granting women the right to vote, the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) released a new report on women in unions. The report found that women in unions earn more than women who are not in a union in every state including West…

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July 16, 2015 by Ted Boettner
Fast Facts: “Right-to-Work” Won’t Boost West Virginia’s Economy

“Right-to-Work” laws do not guarantee jobs for workers. Instead they prohibit unions and employers from including a provision in contracts that requires employees who benefit from union representation to pay for their fair share toward those costs. PDF of Fast Facts. Some state lawmakers argue that if West Virginia adopted a so-called “right-to-work” (RTW) law…

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